Michigan Investigators Seize 56 Gambling Machines, $12,700+

The Michigan Gaming Control Board is working closely with the Michigan Department of Attorney General in identifying and promptly reacting to signals of illegal gambling throughout the Great Lakes State. The increasing number of establishments that install illegal gambling machines is worrying, as, without regulation, it’s said that it can be more dangerous for the players as well.

Four Raids, Two Days

The Michigan Gaming Control Board (MGCB) issued a news piece on Tuesday, October 4, detailing the results from raids that took place last Wednesday and Thursday – September 28 and 29 – at “Redford Township, Taylor and Allen Park gas stations, and a Flint-area store”. According to the report, investigators have seized 56 alleged gambling machines along with more than $12,700 from alleged gambling profits. One machine was seized from each of the gas stations, with the remaining 53 machines being seized from the Mundy Township storefront.

The four raids were conducted with the joint efforts of the MGCB and the Michigan Department of Attorney General – “The MGCB works closely with local law enforcement agencies to investigate alleged illegal gambling locations” said the executive director of MGCB Henry Williams. Mr. Williams also thanked the vigilant citizens for using MGCB’s tip line, and urged everyone who sees violations to contact the MGCB because these illegal operations aren’t regulated and “can bring unwanted crime to neighborhoods.” This is especially important as the number of complaints the Board is receiving is apparently increasing, which can also be a sign that a larger problem with illegal gambling might be brewing beneath the surface. In the closing days of August, 67 devices were seized in a pair of similar raids.

Illegal Assets Seized

The September 28 raids were at Redford Township, Taylor, and Allen Park gas stations, and the machines seized apparently include two coin-pushers, as the MGCB described them in the release. Coin pusher machines are rather simple to install and game on. In essence, the player would insert a coin to play, taking a chance that the machine will push out coins, bills, chips, and whatever else prize that might be on offer. These machines are so simple, that even a DIY enthusiast with knowledge of using an Arduino, which is a physical programmable circuit board that comes with the software needs to be programmed from a personal computer, and the only other necessary component is the body, for which there are pre-cut wood kits. There was also a slot-styled machine seized, which held $290, while the coin pushers held $3,295 in total.

The Mundy Township storefront was raided on the following day – September 29 – and was allegedly offering its customers’ casino-styled games, alongside a purchase of “overpriced snacks and merchandise”, as the MGCB put it. Apparently, by making these purchases customers would receive “promotional” gameplay,” thus receiving their cash awards in winning games. The rest of the total seized sum came from this raid, with the allegedly gaming-related cash coming in at more than $9,100.

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