Cohn Robbins Holdings Welcomes Camelot’s Decision to Withdraw Its Appeal

Allwyn has greeted Camelot’s appeal withdrawal against the decision to give the National Lottery license to Allwyn. In a statement, the company noted that the withdrawal removes a massive obstacle to the UKGC and the transition process can now finally begin. Cohn Robbins Holdings, partners of Allwyn also shared the excitement. 

The UKGC Gave Allwyn the License Back in March 2022 

While speaking about the development, Cohn Robbins noted that as partners of Allwyn, the company couldn’t be happier with the decision. Additionally, the company noted that handing the license to Allwyn is a testament to “the strength and track record of the Allwyn team.” 

The statement shared some details on Allwyn’s dedication to competing in other lottery tenders. One of those includes the US.

Thanks to the fact that Camelot decided to drop the appeal, Allwyn moved a step closer and will most likely run the lottery starting from February 2024. In the beginning, the decision by the UKGC not to give Camelot the license was a major blow and Camelot stated that it may cause a major downfall.

Camelot started running the National Lottery in 1994 and after 28 years on the job, the UKGC decided to select Allwyn as the successor to the lottery in March 2022.  

The Observer obtained a legal submission by the UKGC which stated that the payments to good causes could drop to more than £1 billion ($1.2 billion) if the process of handing over the license is obstructed. 

Kevin Brennan, Labor MP, stated that any handover delay that delays the process of giving money to good causes would be catastrophic, especially in a time such as this one, where people “are facing increasing hardship.” He concluded by saying that it would be better for all parties if the matter is resolved quickly. 

The Risk of Losing Money to Good Causes Is What Made Camelot Withdraw Its Appeal

A Camelot spokesman commented on the company’s decision to withdraw its appeal. He said that Camelot wanted to pursue the opportunity to win a fourth license and run the National Lottery. 

However, the company wanted to minimize the risk in the process and the risks are now too big. The spokesman also confirmed that Allwyn will not be seeking any damages against Camelot “in relation to the undertakings given in July.” 

In 2020/2021, the lottery raised around £1.9 billion ($2.2 billion) for good causes. The money was donated by 12 distributors. Allwyn promised to increase the money that is donated to good causes and that was one of the main reasons why the UKGC awarded the license to the company. 

According to Allwyn, in the 10-year period in which it will run the National Lottery, donations to good causes will reach £38 billion ($43.9 billion). During its 28-year reign, Camelot donated nearly £46 billion ($52.9 billion). 

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